You thought your house was obsolete – how much does an aircraft carrier cost?

US naval Institute report: Chinese have a ballistic missile capable of killing aircraft carriers.

First posted on a Chinese blog viewed as credible by military analysts and then translated by the naval affairs blog Information Dissemination, a recent report provides a description of an anti-ship ballistic missile (ASBM) that can strike carriers and other U.S. vessels at a range of 2000km.

The range of the modified Dong Feng 21 missile is significant in that it covers the areas that are likely hot zones for future confrontations between U.S. and Chinese surface forces.

The size of the missile enables it to carry a warhead big enough to inflict significant damage on a large vessel, providing the Chinese the capability of destroying a U.S. supercarrier in one strike.

Because the missile employs a complex guidance system, low radar signature and a maneuverability that makes its flight path unpredictable, the odds that it can evade tracking systems to reach its target are increased. It is estimated that the missile can travel at mach 10 and reach its maximum range of 2000km in less than 12 minutes.

Supporting the missile is a network of satellites, radar and unmanned aerial vehicles that can locate U.S. ships and then guide the weapon, enabling it to hit moving targets.

While the ASBM has been a topic of discussion within national defense circles for quite some time, the fact that information is now coming from Chinese sources indicates that the weapon system is operational. The Chinese rarely mention weapons projects unless they are well beyond the test stages.

If operational as is believed, the system marks the first time a ballistic missile has been successfully developed to attack vessels at sea. Ships currently have no defense against a ballistic missile attack.

Along with the Chinese naval build-up, U.S. Navy officials appear to view the development of the anti-ship ballistic missile as a tangible threat.

After spending the last decade placing an emphasis on building a fleet that could operate in shallow waters near coastlines, the U.S. Navy seems to have quickly changed its strategy over the past several months to focus on improving the capabilities of its deep sea fleet and developing anti-ballistic defenses.

As analyst Raymond Pritchett notes in a post on the U.S. Naval Institute blog:

“The Navy’s reaction is telling, because it essentially equals a radical change in direction based on information that has created a panic inside the bubble. For a major military service to panic due to a new weapon system, clearly a mission kill weapon system, either suggests the threat is legitimate or the leadership of the Navy is legitimately unqualified. There really aren’t many gray spaces in evaluating the reaction by the Navy…the data tends to support the legitimacy of the threat.”

2 Comments

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2 responses to “You thought your house was obsolete – how much does an aircraft carrier cost?

  1. anonymous

    No worries…we have the “nuclear” deterrent of a balance of trade with the lil fellas…our obese, credit-challenged consumers buy their crap at WalMart; we export obesity (and diabetes, etc) via McD’s, KFC, Coke, Pepsi, etc and create misguided youth globally via our media and entertainment exports; and they buy our Treasuries (so our consumers can keep buying their crap)…all smells like the Ponzi scheme we ran with the lil Japs back in ’80s

    Until these retards actually develop leading engineering schools and start innovative, valuable companies, they all depend upon the US economy and capital markets for their own survival

  2. artist

    “Until these retards actually develop leading engineering schools and start innovative, valuable companies, they all depend upon the US economy and capital markets for their own survival”

    While the U.S. still has many top engineering schools, but their student bodies are made of mostly foreign students. Most “smart” American students opt to go to the Business, Law and Medical schools. Most foreign engineering graduates will stay here to contribute to this country if America offers better opportunity. However, more and more of them are leaving U.S. in recent years along with their education and working experiences. Call them whatever you like. They are too busy with counting money to care.

    One of those days, those “retards” may stop buying the T-note. Watch out for the interest rate, and pray for the banks with all that derivatives exposure from the rising interest. When that day comes, I won’t be so sure about the U.S. capital markets. The U.S. will have to innovate in fields other the financial engineering.

    As for the missiles and nukes, I would not worry about them. Mutually assured destruction only means world peace.