Monthly Archives: August 2012

He doesn’t call, he doesn’t write

Are you sure they said Miami, DB?

Convention ends without a single postcard from Dollar Bill or his Occupy friends.

THE SWEETNESS OF THEIR BITTER TEARS: Occupy RNC ends in tears, frustration. “Republican National Convention protesters sobbed in each other’s arms as their weeklong series of protests came to an abrupt and unremarkable end… Following a fragmented march against the GOP, TheDC’s photo team spoke to several protesters who said they were disappointed by low turnout at protests and the lack of open discussion between protesters and Republican leadership.”

[Professor Reynolds] Pro Tip: It’s easier to have an “open discussion” with people when you’re not dressed as a giant floppy vagina.

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At Harvard, learning by doing

Joe Biden addresses graduates: “Hey, I did it and look where I ended up!”

Half the students in Harvard’s gut course ” Introduction to Congress” accused of cheating on final exam.

“We always stress academic integrity with our students,” [College Committee on Academic Integrity head Jay Harris]   said. “It’s very hard to explain to someone that even though this course was about Congress and students might therefore believe that cheating was both expected and appropriate,  this raises ethical concerns and that’s not OK.” [Note from our lawyers: this quote has been juiced up a bit - Ed].

What’s most impressive about this story is the intended punishment for anyone proved to have cheated: probation, no milk with their cookies and a really, really scary lecture from the dean. Some colleges – I attended a couple of them – expel, or used to expel students caught cheating. Not so at Harvard, not any more. “There’s a crying need for Harvard graduates on Wall Street,” Harris [could have] said. “We can’t just cut off the spigot now and abandon our benefactors.”

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Professional colored man issues State Department guidelines for PC jive

You people are soooo dumb!

“Chief Diversity Office” John Robinson grunts and squeezes and pinches off a lesson cautioning fellow State Department employees how to speak in today’s illiterate society.

For instance, Robinson warned, “hold down the fort” is a potentially insulting reference to American Indian stereotypes.

“How many times have you or a colleague asked if someone could ‘hold down the fort?'” he wrote. “You were likely asking someone to watch the office while you go and do something else, but the phrase’s historical connotation to some is negative and racially offensive.”

He explained: “To ‘hold down the fort’ originally meant to watch and protect against the vicious Native American intruders. In the territories of the West, Army soldiers or settlers saw the ‘fort’ as their refuge from their perceived ‘enemy,’ the stereotypical ‘savage’ Native American tribes.”

He singled out another phrase, “Going Dutch,” as a “negative stereotype portraying the Dutch as cheap.”

And “rule of thumb,” he wrote, can according to women’s activists refer “to an antiquated law, whereby the width of a husband’s thumb was the legal size of a switch or rod allowed to beat his wife.”

Further, he explained, “If her bruises were not larger than the width of his thumb, the husband could not be brought to court to answer for his behavior because he had not violated the ‘rule of thumb.'”

He went on to urge caution over the word “handicap,” as some disability advocates “believe this term is rooted in a correlation between a disabled individual and a beggar, who had to beg with a cap in his or her hand because of the inability to maintain employment.”

Look – there’s nothing wrong with a smart black man figuring out a jive and making a living off his scam, as this guy has done for decades – he was an assistant dean at Brown University, for instance (snicker – see Rhode Island bankrupt, below – ED) but is there really no one left in our political world to at least resist this bullshit?

Here’s just a sampling of fact, all available at an expenditure of just minutes on the Internet, vs. what this fat, ignorant huckster claims is truth as he sees it:

“Rule of Thumb” - The earliest citation comes from J. Durham’s Heaven upon Earth, 1685, ii. 217: “Many profest Christians are like to foolish builders, who build by guess, and by rule of thumb.”[1]

“Hold the Fort”: Oops! That done don’ mean nuttin’ bout chicken feather injuns neither, Kingfish! Probably goes back a thousn’ years ago or so, back looong before whitey done showed up on dese shores.

“Handicap” does not mean “cap in hand”, as the buffoon believes. It dates back to at least 1643 and refers to a barter transaction.

I’ll give the man this much: “Going Dutch” was indeed intended as a slur and dates back to the Anglo-Dutch War in the 16th Century, when Holland was a world power and thus engendered ill will among citizens of other nations. “Dutch Courage” (booze-aided), “Dutch Treat” (no treat at all), Dutch Wife (prostitute) and on and on, these were all fun terms used during a time of active hostilities. That war is over and, speaking as one with a great deal of Dutch ancestry in my heritage, I can say that all is forgiven, and if you want to treat me like a Dutch Uncle, go for it. (Somehow, I doubt anyone at the State Department is losing sleep over whether a person of Dutchness is subject to 16th Century slurs directed at his ancestors.)

But John Robinson should be returned to the street immediately and no replacement hired. You want to cut government spending, I can think of no better place to start.

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Not that EOS needs reminding but ….

Get out while the getting’s good

Rhode Island has arrived at Hell in its hand basket.  Lots of reasons listed here but I’m surprised they don’t mention corruption: that will crush an economy faster and more permanently than anything else: ask a Russian or African.

When it comes to state economies, bigger is not necessarily better — cf. California.

But the nation’s smallest state remains stuck in reverse while the rest of the country slowly regains its footing.

Pick any survey or economic indicator, and Rhode Island is at the bottom.

The state was the only one to register rising unemployment last month.

They also scored dead last in CNBC’s survey of states’ business climates, third-to-last in Forbes’ and fifth-worst in the Tax Foundation’s.

Companies who’ve recently laid off workers there include Blue Cross/Blue ShieldHasbro — and, last February, every teacher in Providence.

We asked to two Rhode Island economists why such a small state could have such massive problems, and they were unanimous in their response: the state has the same problems as other former industrial powerhouse states, but lacks the Rust Belt glamour and urgency to have done anything about it.

“It’s not a recent problem,” he said. “It has a history that goes back to the 1990s, when the U.S. economy moved away from a traditional economy,” to a knowledge-based one. “With that, you had to change the way you organized your economy, a more flexible system to take advantage of innovation.

“We failed to make that transition.”

Permits can take months to get approved, and regulations remain excessively burdensome, he said.

Recent history has further compounded the problem, he said. After 2003’s “Great White” concert fire, which claimed 100 lives, the state revised its firecode that Tebaldi says unwittingly made it one of the most expensive in the nation.

University of Rhode Island Professor Leonard Lardaro agreed.

“Going back decades, if there was any revenue stone to be gotten” state leaders would grab it, he said.

An even greater problem, he said, was brain drain.

“The most glaring deficiency is the lack of skilled workers,” he said.

While the state trains a lot of skilled people, there is no knowledge-based economy to keep them from leaving for Boston or Connecticut, he said.

 

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Chris Matthews should move to Greenwich so he can meet some genuine black people

That suppressed homosexual Chris, “I feel a tingle down my leg” Matthews says he’s an expert on race relations because “I go back to living in D.C. all these years. I’ve lived there 40 years, a black-majority city, and anybody who wants to get up early in Washington and drive down North Capitol and drive past Florida Ave., sees nothing but young, but black people up at 6:30 in the morning going to work.”

In fact, Mr. Matthews lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland, with a resident population of ten blacks. Confronted, Matthews expressed surprise: “You mean those maids and domestics going to work don’t live here? Well then, how about my garbage man, did you count him? He’s definitely a real kneegrow. I’m pretty sure he has a garage apartment somewhere around here and he’s my bro – I speak rap with him and everything, twice a week on pick-up days. So I know these folks”, he insisted, “they’re my peeps”.

If Matthews wants to expand his consciousness while still remaining safe and living in a nice, safe neighborhood, he really should come on up here – I’ll sell him a house next to Wilbur Peck.

Eat your heart out, 50 Cent!

UPDATE: Inagua points out that, when he’s not getting down with his black brothers, Matthews spends time with “the people” at that bastion of the underprivileged, Nantucket. Notice that he’s got the right wife for that too: just as the Golden Retriever is the official dog of Nantucket, so too is its human equivalent: blonde, spoiled and vacuous.

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Democrat’s panicking, lose their pointy heads

Does this dress make me look stupid?

Democrat Party Chairman Debbie Wasserman crashes the Republican convention. Why would Democrats break the long-standing tradition of each party leaving the other alone during their conventions for such a meaningless display of impotence? What was this supposed to achieve?

Wasserman’s appearance in the convention hall (she dragged along that lady who demands free birth control, for reasons as mysterious as her own) was so pointless, so bizarre, it can only be a sign of hysteria, and I don’t think that hysteria is confined to two ugly women – the entire party is losing it. That happens when you have a candidate trying to run away from a record of sheer incompetence and failure, I guess.

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Business? We don’ wan no stinkin’ business!

 

Time out – wait’ll you see her next year!

Stamford opponents seek to derail Bridgewater’s headquarters plan.

The redevelopment of south Stamford, 1,000 high-end jobs (plus, presumable, many more less-well-paid positions), property tax revenue, vs. an aging old marina. It’s their city, and the boaters and anti-development can do as they wish, but their opposition and determination to obstrcut and preven this project strikes me as ill-advised.

But zoning and development plans for the site stipulate the land must be used for water-dependent purposes — specifically, a working boatyard. A move to build a corporate headquarters there needs approval from city officials, who still have a cease-and-desist order pending against BLT for failing to provide plans for replacing the boatyard. BLT has appealed the order.

“It’s really going to become a land-use issue,” [Mayor] Pavia said. “A Zoning Board and a Planning Board review process that I believe will be very involved, probably one of the most involved land use issues that they’ve ever had to face.”

Two officials with perhaps the most power over the project’s future, Planning Board Chairwoman Theresa Dell and Zoning Board Chairman Tom Mills, were invited, but did not attend Thursday’s meeting. Mills said he decided to stay away after Save Our Boatyard members criticized the gathering.

“We were getting a lot of calls from people thinking there were backdoor deals going on and everything else,” Mills said. “I don’t need to stir up the pot any more than it’s already been stirred. They didn’t want me to go so I didn’t go.”

Dell could not be reached for comment Thursday. Maureen Boylan, an organizer with the Save Our Boatyard organization, accused city officials of holding a “secret meeting.”

“Why was it not an open meeting?” Boylan said. “They can try and fast-track it all they want, but it’s not going to happen. Legally, this deal should not be happening because the property is not zoned for it and it violates all the rules in place.”

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