Out of town broker

Cos Cob natives relax before snowplow season

Cos Cob natives relax before snowplow season

There’s a land listing in Riverside on the open house tour today and I’ll go see it: 101 Indian Head Road, or “Red Top”, for those who remember old street names. Although it’s co-listed with Riverside’s own Randy Kelleher, I’ve got to believe it was the Stamford broker who penned this:

RARE OPPORTUNITY. FIRST TIME ON MARKET. A FABULOUS OVERSIZED LEVEL PROPERTY ON PRIVATE DEAD END ROAD OFF INDIAN HEAD. FAR POTENTIAL OVER 8000 SQ FT. HOUSE SOLD AS IS BUT HAS THE “BONES” TO UPGRADE AND ENJOY YEARS OF QUIET LIVING IN A SPECIAL PLACE. FABULOUS BACKYARD WITH INGROUND POOL. COMMON AREA PARCEL ACROSS THE STREET. ALT ADDRESS IS 26 RED TOP ROAD.

Randy would know that there are no “above-ground pools” anywhere in town except Byram and, most famously, Cos Cob, and so would never waste precious listing space on such a superfluous distinction.

And from the “we get results department”, 78 Doubling Road, which just yesterday I guessed was ripe for a price discount, has dropped to $6.1 million today, down from its new Relocation owner’s opening of $6.5 and down considerably from its 2007 purchase price of $8.6. If you can pick this up in the $5s, and it appears you can, that’s probably pretty good.

13 Comments

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13 responses to “Out of town broker

  1. Cos Cobber

    Your photo is sure to stir resentment and jealousy which is not appreciated on the eve of snowplow season and our outrageous plow fees.

    As for the listing description, I think the agent was writing for recent lottery winners.

  2. Anon

    How and/or why can a seller say “as is”? Is it only a case of bank owned properties? Who among us wouldn’t love that option, especially if our home is older and has flown into disrepair.

    • A seller can set any condition on the sale of his property as he wishes and it’s up to the buyer to decide whether to accept those conditions: “no closing before end of school year”; “Buyer must keep seller’s mother-in-law locked in the basement apartment’; ‘children included” – these are all common demands. “As is” is usually used for sales where no value is being assigned to the house, as here. In other words, don’t come whining about a failing roof or even a septic system because you’re being offered land, not a house and land. Again, you the buyer are free to accept or reject this, but you’ll probably lose the property to someone else who wants to build new.

    • Not a Tear Down

      I think ‘as is’ means that a bad building inspection is expected and cannot be used as a reason to reduce the price.

      • Yeah, that’s right. It’s really realtorese for “the house is a wreck and its price reflects that”. A potential buyer is still free to inspect it if he wishes and decide whether he wants to spend the money to make it livable but he shouldn’t expect a price reduction based on the results of that inspection.
        Which doesn’t mean a home’s condition can’t be a factor in negotiations even if its listing says “as is”. That’s why we negotiate.

  3. anonymous

    Tom Ward always says there is no such thing as “as is”.

  4. Riverside Dog Walker

    Unless you are one of the houses on the water at the end of Red Top, which are stunning, I’ve always thought this street and properties along it were dark (from all the trees), kind of creepy, and inconvenient as it is hard for two cars to pass on this road.

  5. armonk

    I sold a house in Greenwich in 2007 “as is.” That meant that the buyer accepted the house in its existing condition and wasn’t going to come back with nitpicking items that needed to be fixed.

  6. Accolay

    Chris, what are your thoughts on the street (RE: Riverside Dog Walker’s comment)? Is it not called Red Top anymore? I’d be interested in knowing the history of street name changes around this area, too!

    • Red Top was so named because the (only?) house on it had a red top. Once owned by Hans Isbrantsen’s family, though they weren’t the original owners, now the road is shared by other houses and they seem to use the Indian Head address.
      Don’t know much about other street names – Gilliam Lane was named after the designer/engineer who built the Cos Cob power plant – he so admired his work, I guess, that he chose to move next to it.
      Marks Road was named after Mr. marks (first name escapes me) George Street and William after his sons, I think. Willowmere got its name from the willows Mr. Marks grew there, to be used for wooden legs for Civil War veterans. The factory for turning out those legs later became Ole’s boat yard.
      Palmers are named for Palmers, who are still here after 350 years or so. Lockwoods were so numerous that I certainly can’t keep track of which Lockwood was named after which descendant, although I remember Luke Lockwood, old even then, keeping horses in a barn on the corner of Lockwood Avenue and Lockwood Lane in Riverside, a barn that was split in two and is still used as two separate residences. Mr. Lockwood hired out his wagon and horses for birthday hay rides, I still remember.
      Chapel Lane is so named because that’s where St. Pul’s Episcopal was before moving in the 1950s down the street to Indian Head and Riverside Avenue. Summit Road used to be called something like “Railroad Avenue” until real estate agents got involved, “Hearthstone”, “Druid” and Bramble” are all developer-generated names and that’s about all I can dredge up off the top of my head.

  7. Real Torme

    Good recall, Chris, Riverside in 25 words or [fewer]. I have a photo of Mr Lockhart’s wagon from Chapel Lane which I can share if it matters.