D you remember when the Americans With Disabilities Act was promoted as merely a tool to treat all people fairly?

Young terrorists tormenting Ms. Maria C. Waltherr-Willard

Young terrorists tormenting Ms. Maria C. Waltherr-Willard

Well no, of course you don’t – that bogosity had a half-life of just nano-seconds, but here’s where we are today: a teacher claims disability because she suffers from fear of children. Hey, works for me, even if she won’t.

Eeek! A child! Who could expect to encounter one of THOSE?

Eeek! A child! Who could expect to encounter one of THOSE?

 

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6 responses to “D you remember when the Americans With Disabilities Act was promoted as merely a tool to treat all people fairly?

  1. Peg

    My husband used to own a number of delivery pizza places. He updated one of his locations – only to find that the Disabilities Act demanded that he redo his counters. The problem? If someone in a wheelchair came INTO the store and wanted to pay for their pizza, the height of the counter wasn’t “appropriate” by an inch or two for this action.

    Never mind that less than about 3% of his customers actually ever came INTO his stores, rather than receive free delivery. Never mind that one of the employees could actually come out from behind the counter, give the customer his pizza and then collect payment without the person in the wheelchair getting near the counter. Nope; none of that mattered. He had to redo the stainless steel tops at a cost of about $40K for one store.

    Stop the insanity!!

    • AJ

      Maybe that’s what put the old art deco, Horn & Hardart Automat on 42nd Street pictured at the link below out of business (google image search it: they have lots of pictures). I imagine from the linked picture, they would not have passed the disabilities act. They had spigots for the coffee and hot water for tea that were shaped like dolphins. We went there a lot when I was a kid, and I liked to hang out at the windows to see if I could catch them putting food in the empty ones, and if I was really lucky, to be able to peer back into the kitchen.

  2. weakleyhollow

    When I heard that the ADA was being considered, I turned to my wife and said: “This will be nothing more than a license to sue.” In this country, that’s what every “right” has become. Sad.

  3. Al Dente

    I knew a baker who was afraid of yeast. He converted.

  4. The Duke of Deception

    The Duke is afraid of being buried alive. Supply your own punchline.