Crime wave strikes Little Switzerland

glendaleThieves install ATM skimmer device at Cos Cob bank’s ATM, make off with the cash. When asked why he focused his attention on Cos Cob and neglected other areas, Willie Sutton is reported (by me) to have said, “because that’s where the banks are”.

10 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

10 responses to “Crime wave strikes Little Switzerland

  1. Huh?

    The premise of the article is that someone installed a skimming device but the advice of Lt. Gray is “urged bank customers to shield the keypad when entering their information”. They can shield all they want, throw their body over the whole machine, but if it’s being skimmed no covering will prevent the information from being hacked. Just saying.

  2. Daniel

    The get the card information from the skimming, but they still need to get the PIN number.

    • Huh?

      I understood the whole point of skimming was that it captures it all – your info and the PIN. Otherwise, what’s the point?

  3. Mickster

    just reading this new report – 50% of Americans on edge of ruin..
    http://assetsandopportunity.org/assets/pdf/2013_Scorecard_Report.pdf
    maybe i should think about buying a gun….

    • When something can’t continue, it won’t. But cheer up, economic ruin is just one of the dark possibilities awaiting us. When a solar flare (or the Chinese) crashes the east coast’s electrical system, the massive transformers required to restore power don’t exist and according to a WSJ article I read a while back, will take three years to manufacture. That may be overly pessimistic – we built the friggin’ Empire State Building in 18 months, but by the time the necessary EPA regulations are complied with, the lawsuits brought by the luddites dismissed and our Congress finishes finger pointing and blaming each other (unless Bush is still around to take the blame), maybe it’s optimistic. In any event yeah, get a gun, while you’re still allowed to.

      • My favorite PBS Show is need to Know. A couple of weeks ago they had a clip called Building Bridges, how back in the day things actually got done. Today, not so much. Here’s a long, but relevant, excerpt, plus a link to the whole show. Worth watching.
        —————————–
        http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/economy/video-building-bridges/16069/

        On May 29, 1935, two years after they had begun pouring, crews placed the last concrete in Hoover Dam. This modern civil engineering wonder stood completed two and ½ years ahead of schedule.

        Across the industrialized world in places like China and Germany, high-speed railroads and gleaming new airports are being built at a great pace. And here in the United States? According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, we have infrastructure so outdated that it will take some $2.2 trillion dollars to fix. There are many reasons behind this grim picture. But one reason, some experts tell us, is how long it takes to approve such projects.

        If you want to understand what’s happening or what is not happening to infrastructure in America, take a look at the Bayonne Bridge, an 81-year-old, mile long structure that connects New Jersey to Staten Island and forms a critical part of the region’s transportation grid. It has also become a textbook example of the law of unintended consequences.

        Because of the bridge’s height–or lack of it–the newer generation of bigger ships that will soon pass through the expanded Panama Canal will be unable to pass under the bridge to reach the Ports of Newark and Elizabeth in New Jersey and Howland Hook on Staten Island. Unless it’s fixed, that will cost the region uncounted billions of dollars in lost economic activity. Port Authority Engineers say they found a solution in 2009 – and now it is 2013. Our story explores what’s holding up (or down) the bridge.

        • TheWizard

          I work in the construction industry, and although the things I’m involved with are doghouses compared to these big scale projects you reference, there is nonetheless a ton of bureaucracy for even the smallest of projects. This all costs a great deal of money and every cent of it is passed on to the end user.
          If people could be made to realize how much father government is killing us in dollar value, they would never stand for it.

        • Perfect example of your analysis: the $$ proposed toll for the new Tappan Zee.