Twin Lakes Revisited
Well this was a disappointment. I mentioned this new listing yesterday and today got to see what’s been done to it in the past 35 years. Not much, it seems. Instead of the waterfront I remember, all that’s left is a view easement and a physical easement that will permit you to cart a Sunfish down to the water, when there is water. The 5 houses I remember being carved out of the original acreage are seven, at least, and they crowd in on this one on every side. The owner of this place was rumored to have money but if he did, he obviously preferred to spend it on legal fees suing his neighbors rather than improving the house – as a lawyer, I applaud such passion; as a real estate agent, I do wish he’d done a bit more than slap up some fresh wallpaper during his tenancy. The staff that ran the kitchen in 1928, for instance, is long gone and won’t be returning. Buyers today tend to do their own cooking, at least occasionally, and when they do, they want more than a ship’s galley to work in.

Ducking one’s head as one passes along a dark corridor to what serves as the master bedroom “suite” feels awkward for someone of my gigantic height. Sure, few people grew to my 5’10 stature eighty years ago but today, many men are approaching 6 full feet, and they’ll bang their heads on these low ceilings.

Etc. I’m a little surprised at the $15 million price tag on what is essentially an obsolete house with a view of the water (or mudflats, depending on the tide) but heck, you won’t know if you don’t try. Or something.

Update: reader ACF says, “Funny, I don’t remember having to duck my head but then again, the last time I went upstairs in that house the Teicherts still owned it, so I was probably around three feet tall.”

And I also heard from this group:Well, we don’t have to duck our heads!

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  1. ACF

    Funny, I don’t remember having to duck my head but then again, the last time I went upstairs in that house the Teicherts still owned it, so I was probably around three feet tall.