Worst kept secret in politics

Rick Perry is going to run for president. I like his economics, hate his social policies. I won’t vote for him, and, since I won’t vote for Obama, if it’s a choice between the two, it will be yet another election where I throw away my vote. But I’m used to that, having done the same thing since 1972.

27 Comments

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27 responses to “Worst kept secret in politics

  1. Inagua

    I urge you to reconsider because social issues rarely involve meaningful leglislation. For example, the most exteme social conservative presidents in recent memory have been Ronald Reagan and George Bush. What socially conservative leglislation did either of them pass? What executive orders did they sign? I think the answer is none. And even if I am wrong and you can identify some social policy you disapprove of, surely it pales to insignificance compared to Obama. A Libertarian Party vote is a vote for Obama.

  2. George Crossman

    What a cop out. If you are waiting for a Presidential candidate who thinks exactly like you it is going to be a long wait.

  3. Roger Kaputnik

    Vote for Pedro.

  4. Inagua

    Chris – Principles should never be compromised if there is something mraningful at stake. But that is not the case here; it is campaign rhetoric only. For example, Roe has survived six pro-life presidents and 13 Repuplican-appointed Supreme Court justices.

    • Well, there’s a year to go, Inagua, so I’ll reserve judgment and make up my mind later. It’s true that JFK lived up to his pledge that he intended to govern the country as its President and not as a subject of the Vatican and so I am, somewhat, maybe a little, comfortable with the idea of a candidate who shares none few of my social mores (I’m willing to overlook Romney’s belief in golden tablets, for instance, I just don’t like the guy). Let us see.

  5. pulled up in OG

    Campaign rhetoric only? Funny. After all that campaigning about jobs, jobs, jobs, it only took them until H.R.3 to:

    -deny tax credits to companies that offer health plans that cover abortion

    -deny medical deductions to individuals even if the abortion is paid with personal funds

    -disallow medical deductions for payments for any health plan that includes abortion coverage or for any medical expenses related to abortion care

    -reat as income any amounts paid for an abortion from a tax-preferred trust or account, such as a health savings account

    On the state level, “rarely” is more like a feeding frenzy this year.

  6. Anonymous

    let the revolution begin

  7. Inagua

    Chris – There is one issue of paramount importance in the next election — the fate of ObamaCare. If it stands then the US is irretrievably on the path to a European style welfare state. Any Republican president will sign repeal legislation, and no Democrat ever will. And yet you are worried about being comfortable with someone’s social views. Your sense of prorities is severly srewed up.

  8. Greenwich Gal

    Bloomberg.

  9. Reader

    If it’s Obama vs Perry, the contrast will be very clear. Large and growing government vs a small and shrinking government. An expanding welfare state vs entitlement reform. Central planning vs free markets. Wealth redistribution vs encouraging entrepreneurship. Appeasing our foes vs standing with our friends. Leading from behind vs Leading.

    I can’t imagine that objections to Perry’s views on social issues would overcome that contrast. Furthermore, Perry has stated that he believes in states making their own decisions. Socially liberal states like CT would be free to pursue the social policies that they want. Don’t forget that Perry endorsed Guiliani last time. He is no social conservative zealot.

  10. Retired IB'er

    Inagua,

    Just off the top of my head how ’bout Dubya weighing in (legally if memory serves) on the Terri Schiavo case in FL. He should have stayed way clear of that situation and NEVER have brought the Federal government anywhere near it…

  11. Inagua

    Pulled Up – Ever hear of the Hyde Amendment? The principle is very simple. Because some taxpayers consider abortion to be tantamount to murder, the federal government has taken the position that no taxpayer dollars should be used for abortion. If abortion advocates were sincerely interested in making the service more widely available, they would take the hundreds of millions of dollars used for lobbying and use it to open low cost or free abortion clinics. But the organized abortion advocates do not do this because they are primarily interested in political power, not tangible on the ground results. Lefties generally want to work through the government; they rarely want to do anything on their own.

  12. Cobra

    I concur, Chris, with most of your views. However, I’ll vote for Perry or any Republican candidate rather than let Obozo or another Demonrat lizard clown continue to pursue the ruinous course on which the latter has pushed this country. For decades, the man has habitually consumed massive quantities of Socialist crystal meth and now we are paying for his crazed, destructive vision of Big Brother utopia. Where are the likes of Barry Goldwater when we need them?

  13. Greenwich Old Timer

    Before the last presidential election, when I informed my husband that I (the classic independent voter) was going to vote for Obama because I was disgusted with the irresponsible spending of the wastrel Republicans, he said he understood but that I should just hold my nose and vote Republican; that he would vote for an orangutan before voting for a Democrat. I considered this to be a most ignorant point of view but have learned my lesson. I’m pretty sure I won’t like the Republican candidate this time around, but orangutan or not he/she will get my vote.

  14. Inagua

    RIB – Bush was disgraceful during the Terry Schiavo agony, but to no effect. Which was my point, that these social issues are very, very small potatoes compared to economic policies like ObamaCare that threaten the future health of the country.

  15. Peg

    Chris, this is a long excerpt from an article I read about Perry:

    Texas is somewhat of a microcosm of the rest of the country, particularly in this first decade of the 21st century. We are very, very cosmopolitan, if you will, very urban, but we have our rural areas. We have an incredible diversity of people [who] live in this state. This is not the Texas of my father. It is a very diverse state. Running for the governorship of the state of Texas, I recognized all the diversity of thought.

    I don’t care WHAT the guy’s religion is. If Perry is focused on getting us turned around fiscally, does not push any of his own social views on the nation, and leaves the non-fiscal issues to states, that is FINE by me.

    Frankly, I’m not certain we could survive another 4 years of Obama. And I am not overstating the case.
    So, what’s the most important thing that’s facing this country? It’s getting this economy back. I am a pro-business governor. I will be a pro-business President if this does, in fact, ensue and I’m blessed to be elected President of the United States — unabashedly [so] because the fact of the matter is, there’s nothing more important than having an environment created by government that allows for the private sector to risk its capital to know that they have a good chance of having a return on the investment.
    And in defending his past support for pro-choice Rudy Giuliani, he said:

    Mayor Giuliani did a wonderful job of managing a city. He was very strong militarily. He was as strong on crime as any big city Mayor has ever been. He and I were 180 degrees on social issues, but he would put strict constructionists on the Supreme Court, which dealt with those social issues. I happen to be comfortable that I was making the right decisions and that as President, when it comes to those social issues, it’s very important to have that strict constructionist view of who you put on the Supreme Court. Because they’d look at the Constitution and say, you know what, that issue dealing with abortion is not in the Constitution. We will put it back to the states. Now if the states want to pass an amendment and three quarters of the states want to pass an amendment to make this be a change of our United States Constitution, then just follow that process. And I’m a big believer that that’s how our country should work.

  16. Peg

    Oops – my above comment somehow got all jumbled. Here is the excerpt from the Perry column again:

    Texas is somewhat of a microcosm of the rest of the country, particularly in this first decade of the 21st century. We are very, very cosmopolitan, if you will, very urban, but we have our rural areas. We have an incredible diversity of people [who] live in this state. This is not the Texas of my father. It is a very diverse state. Running for the governorship of the state of Texas, I recognized all the diversity of thought.
    So, what’s the most important thing that’s facing this country? It’s getting this economy back. I am a pro-business governor. I will be a pro-business President if this does, in fact, ensue and I’m blessed to be elected President of the United States — unabashedly [so] because the fact of the matter is, there’s nothing more important than having an environment created by government that allows for the private sector to risk its capital to know that they have a good chance of having a return on the investment.
    And in defending his past support for pro-choice Rudy Giuliani, he said:

    Mayor Giuliani did a wonderful job of managing a city. He was very strong militarily. He was as strong on crime as any big city Mayor has ever been. He and I were 180 degrees on social issues, but he would put strict constructionists on the Supreme Court, which dealt with those social issues. I happen to be comfortable that I was making the right decisions and that as President, when it comes to those social issues, it’s very important to have that strict constructionist view of who you put on the Supreme Court. Because they’d look at the Constitution and say, you know what, that issue dealing with abortion is not in the Constitution. We will put it back to the states. Now if the states want to pass an amendment and three quarters of the states want to pass an amendment to make this be a change of our United States Constitution, then just follow that process. And I’m a big believer that that’s how our country should work.

  17. fred

    perry different? he’s establishment status quo.

  18. Anonymous

    Look at money laundering in Texas resulting from Mexico’s drug $$ and then realize that the texas “miracle” can’t (or shouldn’t) be replicated across the country.

  19. Cobra

    “former,” not “latter.” But they’re all a bunch of Bozos

  20. AmyT

    If you don’t cast a vote, you aren’t permitted to complain about the outcome. Period. I don’t agree with your politics but think not voting at all is reprehensible.

  21. Shoeless

    Ron Paul, FTW

  22. towny

    Ron Paul, will inject real issues to the forefront, and if nothing else; as a protest vote

  23. pulled up in OG

    Inagua – Yeah. It restricts federal appropriations for Medicaid slugs and gov’t employees, not private insurance policies. American taliban at work, that is all. Shove it.