And all without a government anti-trust suit

Nokia, once the most valuable company in Europe, is going down. Done in by failure to adapt and anticipate technological changes introduced by the Apple iPhone. I’ve always admired Nokia (among other products, it used to manufacture the best snow tires on the road) and so I’ve watched its decline with a mix of sadness and awe, but this is how capitalism is supposed to operate. Interesting to note that Nokia pinned its hopes on Microsoft’s new operating system only to discover that no one wanted Microsoft’s take on the mobile phone. Will Microsoft follow Nokia into oblivion? Sooner or later, sure – and so, eventually, will Apple, if they don’t start spending more on lobbyists. In America and other corporate socialist countries only state-dependent companies are allowed to live beyond their sell-by date.

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8 responses to “And all without a government anti-trust suit

  1. Peg

    As it should be.

    The way that a free market, with sensible but limited regulation works. Those who do well, who innovate smartly, who are able to keep a good workforce and deliver what consumers need and want will prosper … the others will go down the tubes, replaced by those who do a much superior job.

    This is what SHOULD have happened to GM and all the other companies who were saved by the hand of crony government. This is what SHOULD happen to the US post office – a part of our government that did serve a critical purpose a century ago, but today is outmaneuvered big time by private companies. This is a process that ultimately is not to mourn, but to rejoice, in that it continues to deliver us with superior products and services. (Though I know what you mean about Nokia, Chris. I had a cell phone once from them, and it was THE most beautiful phone ever…. sigh.)

  2. Georgie

    Very well said, Peg. Nokia sat on its laurels and idly “watched” Apple, Samsung, and others eat their lunch. Eat or be eaten as they say.

    Too bad Government has no equivalent competition for the delivery of excellent services. UPS and FedEx began by “taking away” some of the services of the post office….but not enough is done to eliminate horribly inefficient government programs and services that can better be done by the private sector. There is nothing like competition that drives a bloated entity to see the error of its ways.

  3. King Arthur Flour survives

    I wondered who the oldest surviving companies were.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oldest_companies_in_the_United_States

  4. Peg

    Government is handicapped, in a sense, by being – almost by definition – a monopoly. Government serrvices really can’t compete, side by side, as private industries do.

    But – that is why we need to aim at keeping government as lean as possible. I am NOT a “no government” person whatsoever. The government provides integral services to us, such as a comprehensive judicial system, a defense system, infrastructure, etc. Would be difficult – if not impossible – to have most/all of this provided privately.

    Of course, that being said, our republic really does have little competing governments: the states. You can be an American, yet choose the types of community and governments locally under which you live. Want liberal madness? Go west, young man! If you prefer the conservative west – Wyoming, Utah or Idaho could be your choice. One of the beauties of our nation.

  5. db

    The soon to be released Windows 8 will have the Metro desktop (phone OS) on every machine running it. In short, it will have everyone running the phone OS whether they know it or not. If successful, moving to buying the phones will be a natural extension. In addition, the machines running 8 will be a hybrid desktop/tablet……possibly removing the need for a computer and tablet.

    In using the pre-release versions, it is good operating system. Good enough to take on Apple and Android………we will all need to wait and see.

    Don’t count MS and Nokia out yet.

  6. nick

    Howard Dean was on CNBC yesterday saying the problem with Capitalism is “they” only think “short term”. Sorry Howard, the beauty of Capitalism is that those that only think short term will be short term.