Daily Archives: June 27, 2013

Crime and punishment update

But will she still respect me in the morning?

But will she still respect me in the morning?

Back in October we told you of the Wisconsin lover arrested for attempting to have sex with his couch, and we’re sure that, like us, many of you wondered about the outcome.

Wonder no more:  He pled guilty earlier this week and was dragged off to the hoosegow.

A Wisconsin man who was caught last year having sex with a couch pleaded guilty to public lewdness Monday. Gerard Streator, 47, was sentenced to five months in jail for the furniture fornication, according to documents obtained by The Smoking Gun. He is also barred from possessing “pornography of any kind” and must pay $243 in court costs.

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This is what passes for objective reporting these days

From a Greenwich Time press release direct from the Associated Press:

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a solemnity reserved for momentous occasions, the Senate passed historic legislation Thursday offering the priceless hope of citizenship to millions of immigrants living illegally in America’s shadows. The bill also promises a military-style effort to secure the long-porous border with Mexico.

 

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More on Tod’s Point and she who cannot be named

Greenwich Conservation Director Denise Savageweeha at her coin-operated water bottle station. "Who needs anything more than pure, clear water?"

Greenwich Conservation Director Denise Savageweeha at her coin-operated water bottle station. “Who needs anything more than pure, clear water?”

Just received the following from Chris Franco, President of the Greenwich Point Conservancy (I’ve supplied the bold emphasis – Mr. Franco is too much of a gentleman to so obviously draw attention to such a delicate matter).

Hi Chris – I am the President of the Greenwich Point Conservancy, and we do in fact have plans ready to go to restore the Old Barn (aka North Concession building), which was built in 1887 and is the oldest surviving building at Greenwich Point. It was a livestock barn when first built, and had two wings and an open section in the middle (covered by the roof). It is listed on the CT State Register of Historic Places, and has been approved for listing on the National Register as well.

Our plans are to restore it to its original configuration and materials (stone and shingle), and add a dining deck on the beach side. The food concession would be rehabbed, and restrooms would be added to the opposite wing, which used to house the Bruce Museum Seaside Center before it moved to the restored Innis Arden Cottage. The brick 1950-era municipal style restroom building would be demolished, and the views up the beach and through the center of the old barn from the roadway would be opened up and terrific.

On Tuesday night the town (as the owner of the building), assisted by the Greenwich Point Conservancy, went before the P&Z commission for a preliminary site approval for the project. Because the Old Barn is a listed historical building, it is eligible for a variance from the requirement to raise the structure per the new FEMA guidelines. This is a good thing, for if such a variance is not obtained, the building will need to be torn down, which would be a huge loss (it would not be possible to raise it 10 feet and still have it be usable; handicap access would not be feasible, nor would it be realistically accessible by anyone for that matter). We have worked closely with the town and the state DEEP to include in the plan various types of construction to mitigate storm issues in the future.

The GPC has privately raised the funds for this work, and also has offered an endowment to cover damage in the future, so that the town would not have an issue with its FEMA insurance coverage generally.

There are some in town who believe that essentially nothing should be built in these coastal and flood zones, and that when buildings are damaged, they should be removed and the coastline essentially reclaimed by nature. While in some cases this may make sense, Greenwich Point is a town park and beach, and it needs to have services. Further, Greenwich Point has an amazing and rare/valuable collection of historic buildings, all of which are in the flood zone. It would a tragedy to loose these cultural resources. No one is prejudiced by granting a variance for a public building such as this, as it is for the benefit of and used by everyone.

Interestingly, we had similar issues when we were beginning our efforts to restore Innis Arden Cottage. It was slated for eventual demolition, and there were those in power who did not believe it should be restored, even though it had survived in that site for 110 years, including through the hurricane of ’38, our worst on record. The GPC had to fight to get the building recognized as an important historical asset and to save it. Now, most people love the restored Cottage and would not think of recommending that it be razed. It is notable that the Innis Arden Cottage is only a few hundred feet away from the Old Barn, and is at the same elevation.

Now we again face the same challenge, with certain people who think that this beautiful 125-year-old building, which has stood on the beach for all that time, should be demolished. I should note that most of the damage to the building in Hurricane Sandy was to sections that had been altered in more recent years – the original parts weathered the storm the best.

I am confident that we will eventually get the right result here, as we did with the Innis Arden Cottage, but we need all the support we can get from the community. If you support the restoration of this great building (trust me, when restored it will be beautiful and its terrace will be the best waterfront dining spot in town, bar none), please let town officials, P&Z members and other land use officials know how you feel.

Thanks and best regards, Chris Franco

Readers who wish to support Mr. Franko’s efforts might do well by contacting Peter Tesei directly, here.

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Sales reported

Three more.

15 Cotswood

15 Cotswood

15 Cotswood finally sold, for $1.6 million. This was a seemingly hopeless short sale situation but obviously the agents got it done. I had trouble justifying even $1.6 as a land value due to the lot’s configuration: swamp and cliff, and the house was in need of some serious work, but I suppose if you plan to live in the existing house, you could be all in at under $2 million on a location close to town, and that’s not bad.

44 Duncan

44 Duncan

44 Duncan, over in Baliwick, sold for $1.280 million after starting off 395 days ago at $1.850. Some people make it hard on themselves.

25 Dartmouth25 Dartmouth Road asked $2.275, got $1.925.

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Looking (in vain) for a concession stand at Tod’s Point?

Temporary concession stand

Temporary concession stand

I’m hearing rumors that the Greenwich Point Conservancy, a privately-funded group, has plans ready to go to replace the concession stand destroyed by Sandy but is being thwarted by Denise Savageau, Greenwich’s “environmental director”. Savageu, apparently, is one of those people convinced that we’ll all be underwater by next year and has insisted that any concession stand, if it is to be built at all, be moved to “high ground”. The only high ground I’m aware of at Tod’s is up on top of the meadow, a mile away from the gatehouse, but hey, you’ll want to walk off all those unnecessary calories anyway, right?

I’m told there are some great emails in circulation by and between Savageu  and the Conservancy. Those of you in possession of any, you know where to send them.

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NPR, and presumably the rest of the White House scribes, are touting this as proof that the IRS wasn’t just targeting conservatives

On NPR, it’s “no harm no foul, they went after everyone” which is technically true. What the editors don’t mention is that “everyone” was 292 conservative groups, 6 liberal.

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I hope I’ve taught my children to be honest, but I doubt I did as well as this woman’s parents

Hong Kong tourist finds bag of uncut diamonds worth $32 million, returns them to their rightful owner. Although no fiscal reward is mentioned, it does sound like she at least had some fun with her good deed:

Fai decided to guard the bag at the cafe and wait for the foreigners to return, wrote IDEX news— and sure enough, one of the Israeli men came rushing back to the scene.

“The shirt on his back was soaked with sweat, and his face was pale. He rushed in and saw the bag with me and leaned forward, uttered some incoherent words and kept bowing and saying ‘thank you’ in Putonghua,” she said, according to IDEX.

She said that she reprimanded him “for being so careless and leaving something so precious behind.”

Opportunity to scold someone for mislaying millions of dollars of diamonds? Priceless.

 

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Sales activity

Trying to rush out the door to check on some broker open houses, but here’s the morning’s activity.

3 Intervale

3 Intervale

3 Intervale (over by Belle Haven, sort of) sold for $3.390 $2.390 (told you I was rushing) after a year or so on the market. Owners paid $2.650 for it in 2006.

41 Angus

41 Angus

41 Angus, $1.750 million.

22 Shady Brook

22 Shady Brook

Three accepted offers, including 22 Shady Brook, Old Greenwich, asking $1.729, and

7 Park Avenue

7 Park Avenue

7 Park Avenue, Old Greenwich, $1.497 and

9 Shore Acre

9 Shore Acre

9 Shore Acre, Old Greenwich, $3.195 million. All have accepted offer within a month or less of being placed for sale.

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Control of the media does work

26% of Obama supporters think Tea Party members are nation’s top terrorist threat. 

Admittedly, these are Democrats being polled, so any threat to their welfare benefits would be alarming, but terrorists? Have to thank the White House scribes press corp for that one.

 

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Red sky at morning

Niña

Niña

The 1928 Starling Burgess sloop schooner (my bad) Niña is missing and overdue bewteen New Zealand and Australia. “Overdue”, is not necessarily “sunk”, of course, and ships often lose their communication capabilities during storms, only to come breezing into port unscathed. But the ocean’s large, and ships are small.

Anyone who grew up sailing on Long Island Sound knew of Niña, and one didn’t have to be a member of the New York Yacht Club (I certainly wasn’t) to know her glorious racing history.

Here’s a brief part of that: 

In 1934, New York banker, DeCoursey Fales bought Niña, and each year of his life he became more and more devoted to her. He would talk for hours about the “old girl”. The rest of Niña’s career was probably fore-ordained as she won the New York Yacht Club Astor Cup in 1939 and 1940. Just before WWII, she won for the first time an event that was to become her specialty, the 233 mile Stanford-Vineyard Race on Long Island Sound. Afterward, she was laid up for the duration of the war. Niña was not allowed to rot, however, and she came out after the war in better shape than ever for a three year stint as flag ship for the New York Yacht Club. Mr. Fales became the NYYC commodore in 1949, and Niña earned her honors by taking first place in ¾ of the yacht club’s squadron races as well as winning the Cygnet Cup in 1949. She made such a habit of winning races that Commodore Fales put the trophies back in competition. It became almost a stock joke that Niña would proceed to win back her own trophies! In 1962 to thunderous cheers, Niña, became the oldest yacht at 34 years to win the Newport to Bermuda Race, under 72 year old Commodore Fales. In 1966, then 78 year old Commodore Fales passed away while his crew was attempting to repeat the Bermuda win. Niña had five owners after Fales, one being Kings Point Academy.

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