Daily Archives: August 8, 2013

28 Brynwood finds a buyer

Dig that crazy Tyvek!

Dig that crazy Tyvek!

This is a failed spec house literally on the Merritt Parkway, purchased October 04, 2002 for $2.5 million with two loans, $1,600,000 and $3,000,0000, the first, apparently from the seller and the second from Ulster Savings Bank. The house was put up, sort of, but long before the Tyvek was covered up the loan had gone bad and Ulster started foreclosure proceedings in November, 2005, whereupon the builder/borrower dug in his heels and kept the suit going for nearly seven years. Foreclosure was final in June of 2012 and whoever owns Ulster’s paper put it up for sale at $3.5 million, a rather optimistic view of this highway property’s value. It finally dropped to $2.650 and someone has bit. My own opinion is that if the buyer’s paying anything close to the asking price, we’ll see this back again in the not-so-distant future.

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Real estate

A number of sale prices reported today, along with two accepted offers.

Sales first:

One Sparrow

One Sparrow

1 Sparrow Drive, Greenwich proper, $3.995 million.

Round Hill

Round Hill

558 Round Hill Road, land, $3.5 million.

6 Loading Rock

6 Loading Rock

6 Loading Rock, Riverside NoPo, $2.4 million. The sellers paid $2.350 for it in 2009. This was – is – a fine house, directly across from the community beach and really well made. The builder who erected it tried to get $3.695 for it in 2008, which was  a foolish price in any market and certainly not the right price during a market crash. But $2.350 looked pretty good in 2009, and $2.4 looks good today.

16 Split Timber

16 Split Timber

16 Split Timber, across Sheephill from Loading Rock, sold for $1.325. That’s what this development is selling for these days.

6 North Ridge

6 North Ridge

6 North Ridge, Havemeyer, has an accepted offer: $895,000.

10 Boyd Lane

10 Boyd Lane

And 10 Boyd Lane, new construction priced at $2.178 million, also has a buyer. This land was purchased for $562,000 in 2011, so the builder is doing very, very well.

Boyd Lane, by the way, is the site of the Great Greenwich Whiffleball controversy back in 2008. The field’s gone now, plowed under by the town, and the high schools kids who played on it are all in their early twenties – everything’s changed, especially the value of the land the game was played on.

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Michelle Obama: “I blame Bush”

Screw Bush, I wanna dog with all the fixin's

Screw Bush, I wanna dog with all the fixin’s

Well no, actually, she doesn’t, nor does the fawning press. Michelle takes credit for reduction in childhood obesity, a trend that was first noticed during the Bush administration a decade ago, in 2003. “No no no”, says Michelle, “my Oprah campaign started in 2010 and by the following year all our nation’s children had slimmed down. Aren’t I the miracle worker?”

Twitchy:

“The period of time analyzed by the CDC researchers was 2008 to 2011. Let’s Move! wasn’t announced until February 2010. By the time the program was implemented, much of the observed decline in childhood obesity presumably had already occurred.

But that’s not the worst of it. Scientific American, in an article published last December, said that the decline in childhood obesity among low-income kids began in 2003.

That would be six years before the Obamas arrived at the White House:

A subtle but important shift in early childhood obesity rates in this low-income population seems to have begun in 2003. Obesity rates increased from 13.05 percent in 1998 to 15.21 percent in 2003. Soon, however, obesity rates began decreasing, reaching 14.94 percent by 2010. Extreme obesity followed a similar pattern, increasing from 1.75 percent to 2.22 percent from 1998 to 2003, but declining to 2.07 percent by 2010.

Public health agencies and the Obama Administration have made battling childhood obesity a priority, although these findings suggest that early childhood obesity rates, at least, were already beginning to decline nearly a decade ago.”

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Self-relience is never a bad thing

Of course when the bureaucrats step in these people will be wearing hard hats and safety goggles but ....

Of course when the bureaucrats step in these people will be wearing hard hats and safety goggles but ….

Greenwich is planning to form a citizens response organization to help respond to emergencies. Beats waiting for the federal government or other outside agencies, and it wouldn’t appear to be expensive (although I’ve never seen a government agency that didn’t swell to meet, and exceed, its budget).

I’ll take local over foreign any day, and this is the first good idea to come out of FEMA since 2011. I’m sure they’ll ruin it in a few years but at least initially, it should be a boon.

Top police and emergency management brass have set the gears in motion for Greenwich to establish its own Community Emergency Response Team program that will train volunteers to take a supporting role in the town’s handling of disaster situations.

A subsidiary of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the CERT program educates civilians in disaster preparedness and basic hazard response methods and gives town residents the skills to help provide support for municipal forces during emergencies. There are some 2,200 CERT programs scattered throughout the United States, including those in Fairfield, Westport, New Canaan, and as of last year, Stamford.

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