Megan McArdle points out what we’ve noted here before: renovations have a very short shelf-life

What will they think of next?!

What will they think of next?! Bitsy shows off her new dishwasher to Muffy – Greenwich, circa 2011

 Old and in the way

HGTV has been around for a couple of decades now, it should have an extensive back catalog. So why, I asked myself, do they limit reruns to the last couple of years?

The answer to the question is obvious almost as soon as you ask it: The older houses would look too dated. This isn’t a huge problem with House Hunters, but for virtually any other show, small details would put off the viewer: the ubiquitous travertine and “Tuscan style” pictures of grapes from the late 1990s and early 2000s; the flashy glass backsplashes that are already on their way out almost as quickly as they came in. So HGTV confines itself to the last couple of years, when the renovations will still look relatively fresh.

HGTV’s products … are essentially a perishable good. A 2008 episode of a kitchen renovation show has essentially expired. It cannot be safely aired.

7 Comments

Filed under Buying/Selling Greenwich Real Estate

7 responses to “Megan McArdle points out what we’ve noted here before: renovations have a very short shelf-life

  1. InfoDiva

    Two things have happened: the renovation cycle has gotten much shorter, and buyers now discount any house needing renovation by at least 2x the potential renovation cost just to cover the hassle factor. A strong argument for renovation only immediately before selling if you’re comfortable in your house as-is.

  2. Cobra

    Lee Kowalski, The Polish Prince of Kitchens, renovated our kitchen in ’86. Still works for us.