So which causes more harm, germs on the ice cubes or the drug those cubes are served with?

 

Your flaming mother, sir

Your flaming mother, sir

California now requires bartenders to wear gloves. I’ve never heard of anyone contracting a sickness from a dirty bar glass or ice cube, although I’m sure it may happen, occasionally, but I have heard of drunk drivers killing people and, worse, numerous cases of the Irish flu. Talk about being sick!

But let’s not worry about that now.

11 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

11 responses to “So which causes more harm, germs on the ice cubes or the drug those cubes are served with?

  1. Libertarian Advocate

    Irish Flu. Is that the same thing as France’s Crise de foie de lundi matin?

  2. Peg

    Sometimes I get the sense that these laws are designed to generate non-stop material for comedians…..

  3. Eddie Spaghetti

    Idiotic. I have worked in the food service business, and when employees wear gloves they tend to wear the same pair for hours. They will take out the rotten trash, then go pick up food with no glove change, and the customers think they’re safe. When they are bare-handed they wash their hands frequently. There are more germs on the gloves.

  4. FF

    I think its less likely that the bartender is going to pick his nose with gloves on, and its unlikely they are going to keep them on while they go to the bathroom so they may actually wash their hands, so when you see them dip their fingers into the olives, or cut your orange, or scoop the ice with their palms, they might not be giving you hepatitis. Why one would complain is beyond me

    • The never-ending urge of “progressives” to invent problems and then “fix” them with a new rule or regulation never ceases to amaze me. You really can’t have perfection on earth, pal, no matter how many rules you dream up, and if you’re going to try, addressing an imaginary hazard like bartenders’ dirty hands is a silly place to start.

    • Peg

      Perhaps they should mandate constant video surveillance of employees. Anyone getting a gloved hand within 2.8 centimeters of their nose is immediately fired, with mandatory 3 months jail time. Think how much safer we’ll all be – especially when all the places that sell drinks close down because most can’t afford $55 to $75 per drink.

      Gotta cover those regulations SOMEHOW!

  5. Riverside Dog Walker

    In order to become accredited, one of our pre-schools in town set up new procedures to follow the required standards. These procedures included ensuring that before a child touched the water faucet handle to turn the water on, they used a paper towel to cover their hand and avoid all the germs on the faucet. I am not making this up. When they were observed/evaluated, the inspectors made sure this was happening.

    I’m not sure what the research shows, but my observation is that the healthiest children have dogs at home licking their faces and enabling their young bodies to develop natural defenses to naturally occurring bacteria.

    • Mazama

      “… my observation is that the healthiest children have dogs at home licking their faces and enabling their young bodies to develop natural defenses to naturally occurring bacteria.”

      In the mid-90s I watched a documentary of some sort that said the death rate from infections in Somalian hospitals – which by our standards were filthy beyond belief – was, in fact, no higher than in American hospitals. I traveled to Chicago frequently where a business associate I socialized with was married to a top cardiac surgeon. The next time I was in Chicago I asked the cardiac surgeon whether the documentary’s claim of equivalence between infection death rates in Somalia and the U.S. could possibly be true. After thinking for a moment the surgeon replied, “I’d guess that’s accurate because while the hospital infection RATE in Somalia is much higher than ours the people there have greater immunity to most infections. My hospital is extremely clean but it can never be perfectly sterile due to ventilation systems and so forth. Although patients are not likely to get an infection in my operating room if they do there’s a very high probability that they’ll die from it.”