Anthropologists study public housing woes

The problem with public housing is that the residents are not the owners.  The people who live in the house did not earn the house, but were merely loaned the property by the actual owners, the taxpayers.  Because of this, the residents do not have the “pride of ownership.”  That comes with the hard work necessary to become owners. In fact, quite the opposite happens. The residents resent their benefactors, because the very house is a constant reminder that they themselves have not earned the right to live in the house.  They neither appreciate the value of the property nor understand the need to maintain or respect it in any way.  The result is the same, whether one is talking about either a studio apartment or a magnificent mansion full of priceless antiques.  If the people who live there do not feel they’ve earned the privilege of occupancy, they will make this obvious through their actions.

Note the common theme of the following photographs…..

Barry !

The desk, built from timbers of the HMS Resolute and a gift from Queen Victoria to President Rutherford B. Hayes, is considered a national treasure and icon of the presidency.

The desk, built from timbers of the HMS Resolute and a gift from
Queen Victoria to President Rutherford B. Hayes,
is considered a national treasure and icon of the presidency.

Barry IV

Barry II

Barry V

MO airforce One

 

 

 

 

23 Comments

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23 responses to “Anthropologists study public housing woes

  1. sunbeam43

    No class trash!

  2. The New Normal

    I don’t get the relevance of the last pic to the post?

  3. Yos

    Heh! No kidding. Is that your comment, or are you quoting?

    To take it a step further, there’s a nasty reaction to moochers’ resentment of their predicament. They create justifications such as “social justice” and “reparations” based upon a mythical victimhood status. They regain a veneer of entitlement by denigrating those who pay for all their ‘stuff.’

    The smarter ones are the worst off, for they sense the cognitive dissonance nagging constantly. They know they’re just parasites, but they don’t necessarily have the value-set or the drive to make a change. They get angry.

    And that’s what you have in the photos.

    Not entirely off-topic: Egyptian architect Hassan Fathy understood the phenomenon well enough. He insisted that occupants of government-funded housing projects undertake construction and decoration of the apartments they’d have so that they would feel a personal responsibility for the final product and for it’s long-term care. He knew that even the poorest would feel pride and honor with a bit of sweat equity.

  4. JJM

    Speaking of, what’s the current overall feel in the Gwch market? Still a frenzy? Slowing down?

  5. Al Dente

    When I was a kid, if I put my feet on a table like that, my father would hit me with a hammer.

  6. EOSredux

    I’m all for pride of ownership. By rights of name, this should be mine, all mine. I resent the benefactor Barry Diller for not giving this to me. He has some nerve.

    http://langandesign.com/project/sy-eos/

  7. We’ve slid a long way since the days of Ronald Reagan, who always kept his jacket and tie on in the office as a sign of respect.

    Like the article says, when you haven’t earned it, you don’t care.

    • anon

      I think both Clinton and Bush kept jackets on while in the Oval Office. However, Clinton went for the predator Pants Free option.

  8. Daniel

    Just making it real, man.

  9. Anonymous

    They both are $#@!%^&**(^%$#@@ to say the least