If you’ve ever wondered whether regulatory agencies have slowed our economy, try imagining how Thomas Edison would be treated today

Amazon wants to develop delivery drones – that won’t fly with our protectors

Commercial drones have taken off in other countries. Thousands of drone companies operate legally under simple safety rules in Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong. These companies use drones to deliver emergency medications, to monitor farms, drilling areas and construction sites and to film movies and news. By contrast, the FAA has approved a mere 10 commercial drones operators in the U.S.

In July, Amazon asked the FAA for permission to test its drones in a rural area outside Seattle. Regulators responded in October with a long list of questions, including this doozy: “Why granting your request would be in the public interest; that is, how it would benefit the public as a whole. What data or analysis supports Amazon’s position that aerial delivery is in the interest of the American public?”

For that matter, had the FCC still had the power to protect AT&T’s monopoly when Steve Jobs proposed an iPhone, he’d have been disconnected .

9 Comments

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9 responses to “If you’ve ever wondered whether regulatory agencies have slowed our economy, try imagining how Thomas Edison would be treated today

  1. Anonymous

    I encourage innovation, but I dislike when public goods are monetized for personal gain. For some, you couldn’t pay them enough to put up with objects buzzing all around. How big a tax should we impose on parties that profit from public goods? As it is, we don’t tax frackers nearly enough for the long term damage they do.

    • Anonymous

      As it is we don’t tax bureaucrats employing the public/private revolving door, nearly enough for the long term damage they do.

      The fedgov without Constitutional restraint has devolved into another criminal gang. This one is filled with crooked cronies, race hustlers, victimologists, perverts, Commies and Muslims.

  2. Anonymous

    Sounds kind of like the Grrenwich Building Dept.

  3. Anonymous

    Considering commercial pilots have already made dozens, if not hundreds, of reports concerning drones in their flight paths–at even this very early stage in the game, with very limited use–I’m not so worried about the FAA stifling innovation. Since there are real dangers to widespread drone use, there should be some demonstration that use of these things is in the public interest. To me, drones seem to be a marketing ploy aimed at the same idiots crowing about 3d printing–drones can hardly be efficient delivery mechanisms, in either time, money, or energy use, since they have to be small enough to make deliveries at ordinary addresses.

    • Call It Like I See It

      … and the first car was not considered an efficient form of transportation, nor were the first airplanes.

  4. My rant

    No drones please.

  5. Anonymous

    It’s like Cuba. Everything not authorized is forbidden.

  6. Anonymous

    I have this vision of drones all crashing into each other above Round Hill road trying to deliver sushi, Amazon products, fresh direct kale, organic vodka.