Daily Archives: April 2, 2015

Back from open houses

I saw a couple of interest, which I’ll write about later today (too much concentrated real estate is bad for my mind), but here’s a contract reported that looks pretty good.

15 Shady Lane

15 Shady Lane

15 Shady Lane, in Glenville, asking $1.995 million and only 20 days on the market. I didn’t see it, but from its pictures it appears to be a very nice house, with lots of room and  a good setting. You may or may not want to live in Glenville (I happen to like the area), but it’s amazing how much more house your money can buy over here.

105 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

I can’t think of a more appropriate setting

Congressional Lounge

Congressional Lounge

A grateful Las Vegas whore house offers to throw Harry Reid a retirement party . Not only appropriate for Harry, perhaps Sheri’s Ranch could be designated as the official site to celebrate all retiring senators’ public service.

10 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Bill Clinton must be kicking himself for not thinking of this

When you belong to the state, anything can happen, and will

When you belong to the state, anything can happen, and will

Mourning period over, Kim Jong un assembles a new harem to replace those let go when the Dear One passed on.

The previous “pleasure troupe” was disbanded on the death of the old dictator in December 2011, but with the official three-year mourning period now over, Kim is free to start his own.

The “pleasure troupes” were a practise introduced by Kim’s grandfather, North Korea’s founding father, the ‘Eternal President’ Kim Il-sung.

Government officials would conduct searches of the countryside for the most attractive young women, typically taking 30 to 40 every year, who would become maids, singers, or dancers following an interview with the leader.

The prettiest would be expected to become the leader’s concubines, eventually passed on – or “retired” – to high ranking military or government officials after they reached their mid-20s.

Often as young as 13 or 14, the recruiters would tell their parents that their daughters were being taken away on a government mission to serve the nation’s leader. As with everything in North Korean society, the parents had no say in the matter, even if they did have suspicions over what was really happening to their daughters.

 

7 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized