Daily Archives: April 22, 2015

Friggin’ WordPress

Reader and frequent contributor Al Johnson has been blocked out of this site by some software malfunction, so he sent me this comment via email, regarding real estate agents “overpricing” their own homes:

Freakonomics got a lot of attention from that piece, but they missed most of the real reasons. Agents’ houses are almost always in better shape, and better prepared for market, than those of the average seller.

But the biggest factor? Everybody thinks their house is the best out there: after all, you bought it because you loved it. Consequently, everybody thinks their house is more valuable than the competition. Much of an agent’s job in taking a listing is talking the seller down to a realistic price. But when the seller is the agent, who’s going to talk him down? Hence the almost universally overpriced agent-owned listings, and the consequent longer market times. It’s not a conspiracy, just stupidity–

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You may want to close your windows

Montana ThunderstormThunderstorms are arriving in North Stamford

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It’s back again

16 Shoreham Club Road

16 Shoreham Club Road (Color tinting by Barberie PhotoShoppe)

16 Shoreham Club Road (just before Tod’s Point), which has been for sale since 2013, when it asked $8 million, has returned to the market at $6 million. It’s god-awful butt-ugly (architectural awards notwithstanding) (one person I know just termed it “deliberately offensive”, but that’s the hallmark of the Yale School of Architecture) on the outside, but the interior’s pretty swell, with the exception of a galley kitchen that looks like it belongs on a ship, not in a house. Convenient for cooking, though, and isn’t that at least part of what kitchens are for?

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Price Dislocation

35 Normandy Lane

35 Normandy Lane

35 Normandy Lane, on an acre on a dead-end street off Indian Head, started at $3.950 million in 2014, and is now down to $3.295. I understand that 1968 construction is no longer desirable in Greenwich, and perhaps this should just go for its land value (similar land and house, now torn down, sold on Welywnn for $2.75 last year), but the idea of someone paying $2.8 for new construction on Meyer Place vs., say, the same price for this one boggles the mind.

In the long run, it’s the land, not the house depreciating on top of it, that sets the value, so, low ceilings notwithstanding, I’d have gone with this one.

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Upland Drive

35 Upland

35 Upland

35 Upland Drive has closed at $3.5 million (original ask back in 2011 was $4.5). Certainly a lot more house than you’d find in Riverside for this price.

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Mid-country Sale

723 Lake Avenue

723 Lake Avenue

723 Lake Avenue, which sold for $5.775 million in ’08 (after starting off in 2005 at $7.2500), has just resold, for $5.340. Depreciating asset.

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Someone couldn’t afford his lease payment, is my guess

Come and get me

Come and get me

2013 Mercedes-Benz GL550 stolen after being left with doors unlocked and two sets of keys in car. You used to have to the Bronx to accomplish this. Now, they’ll come to you, probably on order.

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New construction sale

16 Annjim Drive

16 Annjim Drive

16 Annjim Drive, $3.195 million, sold in 5days.

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What is it about real estate agents pricing their own homes?

636 Riversville Road

636 Riversville Road

636 Riversville Road (not an Ogilvy listing) came on back in 2013 at $6.750 million, is now down to $5.750, and still unsold. It’s a nice house, but Riversville rarely supports this price level.

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I won’t say it’s the end of days, but are we nearing the bursting point of the bubble?

11 Meyer Place

11 Meyer Place

11 Meyer Place, Riverside, a few hundred yards from I-95 and not much farther from the Post Road, has a contract at $2.880 million. 3,500 sq. ft. plus a basement, one-quarter acre; holy cow.

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How far we’ve come

We won't listen

We won’t listen

In 1927, scientists held a debate on the validity of quantum physics.

Einstein, stop telling God what to do,” physicist Niels Bohr once told Albert Einstein, who in a room full of the world’s most notable scientific minds argued “God does not play dice.”

In 1927, Einstein and Bohr were two of the 29 scientists (more than half of whom were or would later become Nobel Prize recipients) in attendance at the Fifth Solvay Institut International de Physique in Brussels to discuss the foundations of the newly formed quantum theory.

During the conference, Einstein led a series of thought experiments in which he tried to prove that the “Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle (and hence quantum mechanics itself) was just plain wrong,” according to Jonathan Dowling, codirector of the Horace Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics.

“Each sleepless night, Bohr would worry and fume and ruminate about Einstein’s attack, and then he would respond the next day with a keen rebuttal, showing where Einstein has missed something, and salvage Heisenberg’s principle. This debate went on for days at that Solvay conference and continued on 3 years later at the next conference,”

Bohr’s counterattack involved using Einstein’s own theory of relativity against him — and it reportedly won the argument. Eight years later, Einstein still struggled to prove that the theory was incorrect, instead describing it as “incomplete.”

That was an argument among geniuses: Einstein, Bohr, Max Plank, Madame Curie, and more, about the very nature of the universe. Today, debates about due process of law, sexual harassment and global warming are shut down by students and faculty members because the subjects are just too distressing to contemplate.

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When we’ve lost the military leadership, we’re close to losing the country

Emasculation and humiliation are just the first steps toward eliminating the military

Emasculation and humiliation are just the first steps toward eliminating the military

Army ROTC soldiers forced to parade around campus in red high heels

Army ROTC cadets are complaining on message boards that they were pressured to walk in high heels on Monday for an Arizona State University campus event designed to raise awareness of sexual violence against women.

The Army openly encouraged participating in April’s “Walk A Mile in Her Shoes” events in 2014, but now it appears as though ROTC candidates at ASU were faced with a volunteer event that became mandatory.

“Attendance is mandatory and if we miss it we get a negative counseling and a ‘does not support the battalion sharp/EO mission’ on our CDT OER for getting the branch we want. So I just spent $16 on a pair of high heels that I have to spray paint red later on only to throw them in the trash after about 300 of us embarrass the U.S. Army tomorrow,” one anonymous cadet wrote on the social media sharing website Imgr, IJReview reported Monday.

Just five days ago, the Secretary of the Army declared that his top priority for 2015 was not fighting wars, or terrorism,or preventing either, but “ending sexual assault in the ranks”. Obama set out to to, and succeeded in purging the top ranks of warriors; there are those who think he’s insane, there are others who say, he’s only insane if you mistake his aims and objectives.

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