I may have to subscribe to HBO just to catch this show

Greenwich Country Day applicant, replaced as per request of GCD parent. On a scale of 1-10 on sensitivity, I'd give this a 9.

Greenwich Country Day applicant, replaced as per request of GCD parent. On a scale of 1-10 on sensitivity, I’d give this a 9.

Mad Men episode:

Fans of the show also got a final glimpse of Pete’s ex-wife, Trudy (Alison Brie), who called Pete, panicked, because their daughter, Tammy, was not admitted to the Greenwich Country Day School. Pete thought he could pull rank because some members of his family had attended it, but the headmaster revealed that Tammy had performed poorly on a standardized test and would not be getting in. The encounter ended badly, with Pete punching the headmaster, but he scored points with the social-climbing Trudy.

71 Comments

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71 responses to “I may have to subscribe to HBO just to catch this show

  1. another starbucks 4 me

    All of the above and a 300-year-old grudge between those two ancestral Scottish clans, “…no Campbell will ever mix with a McDonald.” The headmaster “is” a McDonald.

  2. Anonymous

    I found this episode totally unbelievable. GCDS has never turned down an application for a student who can pay full freight.

  3. Anonymous

    never watched the show. it takes place in greenwich, seriously?

  4. Chris Pollack

    Chris you have T -20 minutes to take this picture down

    • ? Your kid? I’ll take it down, but you shouldn’t let pictures of your children hit the internet, where they’re fair game for anyone who wants to use them.Be careful out there: Google images for “Greenwich Country Day”, and there they are. All of that notwithstanding, I apologize.

      • Cos Cobber

        Wow, so the rejection photos are authentic! Well, partially so.

        I kid of course.

      • Chris Pollack

        Yes it was in Greenwich Time with permission. thank you Chris

        • Again, my apologies- as you know, I’m a parent too. Sometimes, I leave that perspective.

        • AnonnaMom

          I don’t wish to sound harsh but I’d never give any newspaper permission today to run my young children photos with their names and ages. CF found the photo simply by googling. So your permission to the newspaper became permission for ANYONE to run that photo later, without your knowledge or permission. You are lucky that CF is a gentleman who wouldn’t hurt a fly. Be careful next time.

          • And isn’t that a sad commentary on the modern world, where a proud parent must fear his child being recognized for her achievement. But, once again, and again, I’m sorry I added to that – I just wasn’t thinking.

      • Chris pollack

        Chris F,
        Thank you for taking down the photo. Lesson learned. You’re a gentleman.
        Regards,
        Chris Pollack

    • anonymous

      I’d think any dad would be proud of why this photo was online. Rather than take it down, better to share the news link why the girls made the newspaper. There are two or three photos of them.
      http://blog.ctnews.com/realtime/2013/04/13/two-champs-for-champs/

  5. That’s really how I thought – anyone who reads this blog should know that the pictures I use rarely have anything to do with real story. On the other hand, as a parent, I can understand his ire. No harm meant,no harm caused, I hope.

  6. Anonymous

    CF, get a Roku and watch on Amazon – added bonus: no commercials. No need to subsidize the retards at Cablevision.

  7. Mickster

    It never ceases to amaze me that ANY story that involves a school (real or imaginary) on this blog, gets tons of comments.

  8. Publius

    I believe the next episode has Trudy taking Tammy to see a young doctor in Michigan named ah….ummmm… errr… John Kervorkian??? Sound familiar???? I think he goes by “Jack” if I am not mistaken.

  9. Greenwich Gal

    The reason schools always get a rise out of people is that it is one of the issues that defines our current problems as a nation. Class differences, unions, the shrinking American economy, immigration, the gender gap – you name it – it is all in there.

    • Mickster

      GG, you’re so right. It’s where the inequality in this country begins. I’m not really political but one of the obvious solutions (at least to my mind) would be to have a national standard curriculum with standardized testing nationwide so that everyone is accountable and we don’t find ourselves graduating illerates.

      • housecat

        Isn’t that what Common Core is supposed to do?

        • Mickster

          Apparently it is. Seems not to be a popular idea here. God (and unions) forbid we should have standards and accountability.

        • I have two kids in common core programs, one in 7th and one in 9th grades. The math and science are definitely harder than what I had at those ages. I think it’s a good thing, and if the unions don’t like being held accountable, too bad.

          If every kid in a 7th grade math class couldn’t do long division, wouldn’t that be a good thing to know?

      • That’s pretty much the idea behind “common core”.

      • Common core is a horrible program, forcing teachers to dumb down classes in the better schools so they can “teach to the test”. In addition, because its a central government program, history is being eliminated from the curriculum and what little is left is being transformed into a liberal’s history of the United States Imperialism and oppression. See Howard Zinn, “A People’s History of the United States”, for example. According to Zinn, and as now taught in our schools, even WW II was an attempt by the US to expand our hegemony, crush the evil communists and pick on the Japanese. The country’s in trouble.

        • Anonymous

          Not to mention the fact that children are being required to learn things in a disconnected and illogical manner.

    • Anonymous

      Exactly. And the funniest part is, schools play an overall very small part in a child’s success. And success is a very small part of happiness. And aren’t parents supposed to be concerned with their children’s happiness?

  10. getting them into the ‘right’ schools takes planning

  11. Anonymous

    This mom is teaching her kid something the youth at GCD will never learn. This is a very interesting dynamic.

    http://nypost.com/2015/04/28/baltimore-riot-mom-is-mother-of-the-year/

  12. Anonymous

    at one point head of admission at gcds was also with her husband head of admission at the belle haven club…….and husband was a broker…talk about the perfect trifecta of conflicts of interest! just gross….

    • housecat

      She removed herself from the process when we applied, because we know one of her brothers. In other words, she did exactly what she should have done to prevent any potential conflicts. Our son was waitlisted at Country Day (he goes to another school now), if you’re thinking we still got special treatment despite this. I’m sorry, but I totally disagree with what you’re implying.

      • Anonymous

        The point is that because the husband’s a broker, people will want to use him to sell/buy so his wife can help with club/school admission. Knowing her brother < paying her husband a huge commission. Even if it doesn't actually work, people do it with the hope that it will.

        • housecat

          In other words, not an actual conflict of interest.

        • Anonymous

          In other words, a conflict. The position of power occupied by the wife induces others to pay money to her husband. Got it? Or have you not read about the Clintons lately?

        • housecat

          Are you for real? Anyone stupid enough to think that using ___ broker will give them an edge in private school admissions has only themselves to blame when it doesn’t work out that way. This broker’s wife would have been required to recuse herself in your hypothetical, based on the parents’ business relationship with her husband. That’s how it works. This couple is hardly the Clintons, for god’s sake, so spare us the pseudo-Machiavellian nonsense. There’s a concept called Caveat Emptor. Got it?

  13. nutmegger

    GCDS – just a place that hopeful-upwardly-mobile residents park their kids for 8 hours a day while they go to AA meetings or plan benefits for local charities.

    • Anonymous

      what a silly comment

    • Anonymous

      none of whom read this blog, apparently, given the number of rejected parents who’ve commented here

    • anon

      Ouch! Truth hurts.

    • Anonymous

      GCDS is a fabulous school that teaches our kids exactly the right kind of morals and values, in addition to terrific academics and arts and sports. And it has an awesome involved accomplished parent body that absolutely cares about the kids and their education.

    • Anonymous

      Remember: Children are status symbols and vessels for their parents’ personal hopes, dreams, and insecurities. Any independent interests and feelings children may experience are secondary to these purposes and best squelched early.

  14. RiversideMan

    What about the other GCDS, Glenville Children’s Day School?

    • Anonymous

      Man, you seriously have a hard on for Glenville. Are you terrified that people will find out Pop was a plumber? Calm down. You’re the only one who cares.

  15. anonymous

    Arg!! What is wrong with everyone! Is it so hard to believe that maybe, just maybe, rich people love their children and are thrilled beyond measure to be able to send them to a school as beautiful as GCDS? It is a top notch institution with an amazing faculty, caring and involved parent body, and programs on the cutting edge of education. All the parents I know are supportive, aware of their good fortune, and not trying to use their children as social stepping stones.

    • housecat

      This post certainly attracted more than its fair share of trolls. Don’t let them get to you.

    • Anonymous

      Private school discussions always attract the freaks who would have you believe that private schools are repositories for troubled children who can’t succeed in the public system.