We should take them at their word

Smart Diplomacy™

Smart Diplomacy™

White House: “Policy success” led to 150 muslim terrorists being released to join ISIS.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Thursday that up to 150 Muslims in America have joined, or have tried to join, ISIS in northern Syria, amid an intensive government-backed anti-radicalization campaign by U.S.-based Muslim groups.

The campaign “has been a successful, fruitful partnership that has protected the American people, including American Muslims,” he claimed.

The Daily Caller asked Earnest to explain how the attempted or successful effort by up to 150 U.S.-based Muslims to join the Islamic States is compatible with his claim of a successful anti-radicalization campaign.

“Check with Homeland Security on that,” Earnest replied.

Earnest did not say what an unsuccessful partnership would have accomplished.

When they say their policy was  success, they mean it; how come so many don’t recognize that?

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Or the camel’s nose under the tent

"Freedom is slavery" G. Orwell,1984

“Freedom is slavery” G. Orwell,1984

Hillary supports the new regulatory scheme for the internet: “It’s a foot in the door.”

The whole idea of subjecting the internet to “demonstrated public need” regulatory review is that now politicians can demand bribes from entrepreneurs. Duh.

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The sky is falling – or freezing, anyway

Don't they know, it's the ennnd of the world ... 1934

Don’t they know, it’s the ennnd of the world … 1934

Global warming brings NYC temperatures this month to their lowest level since 1934. “1934 marked the highpoint of horse-drawn traffic”, Chief Global Warming Priest Albert Gore explained to FWIW. “And though now, thank Gaia, we’ve gotten rid of all of them except a few in Central Park, which my friend and ally Bill DeBlasio is eliminating, we’ve replaced horse manure and methane with the evil fumes of gasoline. Oh, woe is us!”

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Mid-Country contract

32 Sawmill Lane

32 Sawmill Lane

32 Sawmill Lane, asking $3. 195.  Sellers paid $2.975 for it in 2011, and since nothing was done to it between then and now, I guess that’s slightly encouraging for owners in this area – these homeowners should just about break even.

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Well, … maybe

3 Old Round Hill Lane

3 Old Round Hill Lane

3 “Old Round Hill Lane” (which is actually, “New Old Mill Road”- it was probably named by its developer when Round Hill Road still had cachet, before half its denizens were dragged off to prison) is a new listing priced at $8.995 million. It’s a beautifully proportioned Kali-Naagy house, and a very nice house indeed. New, it sold for $6.5 in 2003; used, it sold for $6.110 in 2010. These sellers have updated it, apparently, and hope to reverse its downward trend of depreciation.

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(Another) price cut on Round Hill Road

297 Round Hill Road

297 Round Hill Road

297 Round Hill Road, now down to $4.750. This was, and still is, a unique house, and was really pretty cool when it sold for $5.7 million in 2006. Those buyers tried selling it two years later, unchanged, for $7.250, and finally settled for a 19% haircut in 2010, selling it for $5,212,500. And then those buyers “renovated it” and placed it back on the market in 2010 for $5.699 million; it’s been pretty much on the market ever since, with various price cuts over the years, down to today’s $4.750.

It remains a good house, but the reaction of many agents back in 2010 was that the renovations had reduced, not enhanced its appeal, and judging from its lengthy stay on the market, buyers seem to agree. Still, at a million less than that 2006 price, it seems that the owners have paid penance for their ill-advised changes, and this should be a pretty good buy today.

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Missed opportunity

39 Doubling Rd

39 Doubling Rd

39 Doubling Road, bank owned, has sold for $2.9 million. Ogilvy sold it (he had both sides of the deal), in 18 days, for its full price of $6.250 million back in 2007, and though that was a ridiculous price, $2.9 is  a good deal. Most painful to me, I contacted every client I had just before the foreclosure became final, advising them, truthfully – inside information, sort of – that they could buy this for $2.5 million. No one bit, even though that was pure land value.

The house could easily absorb another $2.5 in updates and restoration, but it will be worth more than that when it is. Or, torn down and replaced, it will also be worth a fair penny.

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