Off to Maine

Maine moose hunters - another successful trip

Maine moose hunters – another successful trip

Visiting John and family, back, probably, Thursday. I’ll be blogging, but it will be limited (especially during the 5-hour trip up there and back – where’s my chauffeur?)

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Say, here’s news

We win again!

We win again!

Greenwich gets 1¢ from the state for every tax dollar we send up to Hartford. Other towns do better, naturally.

Reached for comment, Francis Fudrucker, Chief Apparatchik for the Greenwich Democratic Party, was unapologetic: “Welcome to the People’s State of Connecticut, chump – from each according to our ability to squeeze, to each according to who our friends are. Love it or leave it, eh?”

 

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Riverside sale

43 Bramble Lane, Riverside, new construction, $4.1 million. It’s not worth the trouble to chase down sold listings and pictures of sold houses anymore because of the Greenwich Board of Realtors’ efforts to hide them, but it’s your basic new home, basic insane price.

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Cos Cob contract

16 Old Camp Lane

16 Old Camp Lane

16 Old Camp Lane $1.695, 40 days on market

 

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Contract reported

314 North Maple Avenue

314 North Maple Avenue

314 N. Maple Avenue, started at $1.850, last ask, $1.695 million. A complete re-do, but great location. My own clients were tempted, but the roller coaster floors and tilted lolly columns in the basement made them fear for the home’s structural integrity. Apparently, an engineer’s report reassured these buyers on that question.

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Sell, sell, sell

Seek shelter

Seek shelter

NASDAQ regains 5,000 level, first time since 2000

But what do I know?

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The 3rd Amendment – has its time come round again?

British Quartering Act, 1775

British Quartering Act, 1775

Glenn Reynolds on the most ignored protection of our Bill of Rights.

Excerpts:

[The Amendment]  provides: “No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.”

That doesn’t happen much — The Onion ran a parody piece some years ago entitled “Third Amendment Rights Group Celebrates Another Successful Year” — and so it may just be that the Third Amendment is the only part of the Bill of Rights that really works. Except that it may not be working the way that we think.

In the 18th century, when the Third Amendment was drafted, “troop quartering” meant literally having troops move into your house to live at your expense and sleep in your beds. It destroyed any semblance of domestic privacy, opening up conversations, affection, even spats to the observation and participation of outsiders. It converted a home into an arena.

Today we don’t have that, but we have numerous intrusions that didn’t exist in James Madison’s day: Government spying on phones, computers, and video — is spyware on your computer like having a tiny soldier quartered on your hard drive? — intrusive regulations on child-rearing and education, the threat of dangerous “no-knock” raids by soldierly SWAT teams that break down doors first and ask questions later.

At common law, the saying was that a man’s home is his castle, or, as William Pitt put it in 1763: “The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the crown. It may be frail, its roof may shake; the wind may blow through it; the storms may enter, the rain may enter — but the King of England cannot enter.”

In this post-drug war era of no-knock raids, SWAT teams, and governmental spying, it’s sad to think that we are, in fact, less secure in our homes than “the poorest man” in his own cottage was under the English kings we once revolted against. And if that’s the case, maybe the Third Amendment isn’t working as well as we think.

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